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Breastfeeding: fixing latch issues

Bundoo Lactation Consultant
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Breastfeeding: fixing latch issues

Hello Everyone,
Join me to discuss latch issues and how to fix them. We will talk position, tongue tie, the non-latching baby, how to fix them and what to do to protect breastfeeding while working through these challenges. Let me know what questions you have. I look forward to hearing from you!

Comments

  1. What are the signs of lip and tongue ties? My son had an undiagnosed lip tie (several actually) that didn’t keep us from breastfeeding, but I was in a lot of pain for about 6 months. I was told that his latch was perfect and that the pain should go away soon. No one ever checked him for ties. His dentist discovered the ties at his very first dental appointment. I immediately checked my daughter for tongue and lip ties when she was born, but luckily, she was tie-free! Just want other moms to be aware of what to look for and what the signs are. Thanks!

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    1. Roxanne,
      Unfortunately there is limited training in finding tongue and lip ties. Some signs can be:
      heart shaped tongue
      compressed nipples,
      blister on upper lip
      non-latching baby
      flattened nipples
      slow weigh again

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  2. I am ready for your questions, comments and challenges

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    1. When you have a newborn I was very hungry while breastfeeding. How long does that last for?

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      1. This can be different for everyone – some people get really hungry while others may not feel hungry at all. Make sure you are hydrated – sometimes we feel hungry when we are thirsty, especially when nursing

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  3. Hi Leigh Anne! I keep missing class at the Y!! Boo.

    So my little one had her LT and TT revised by Dr. Dahl at 3 weeks. She is now 12 weeks. Her latch isn’t as deep as it used to be. Is it possible her TT is back? I also had mastitis 2 weeks ago and another blocked duct now. Is it possible that her latch problem is causing these blocks?

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    1. Hi Melissa,

      It can be that the TT was not released deeply enough or the tissue has grown back. It may help to “sandwich” your breast in the mean time. Another revision of the tongue may help. Another option may be some body work.This may help to loosen her up.

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    2. Mastitis can be from a poor latch, it can be from a wounded nipple, or it can come from a plugged duct – avoid wearing a bra that is too tight and avoid sleeping with a bra

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  4. When latching many moms are told to press their baby’s head into their breast – this can make the baby intimidated, it can cause the baby to chomp down, when latching bring the baby to you, avoid pressing onto her head, this may help

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    1. Thanks!

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  5. My daughter has just started unlatching frequently during nursing. Not just unlatching, but unlatching to look around and amuse herself, etc. She gets angry if I pull my shirt down and the breast isn’t readily available when she is ready to re-latch. I am a public breastfeeder so this isn’t ideal. When she relatches she is feisty because she wasn’t happy she had to wait a moment/search for it. What’s the best way to handle her attitude when it makes me physically uncomfortable to nurse her with an aggressive latch (she has teeth)?

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    1. How old is your daughter?

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      1. 14 months

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        1. Ah, toddler nursing – so much fun but the off and on is a real thing, let her know that if sh wants to nurse she needs to stop popping off an don – this is challenging because she can get distracted and nursing is so comforting for a teething toddler – this is the beginning of setting limits

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    2. This can be a teaching opportunity. Let her know that if she wants to nurse, she can nurse but if she pops off for more than a few seconds you can tell her that she needs to get serious with nursing or she can do something else. I am imagining an older baby – 6 months or older?

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      1. Thank you! Knowing it’s time to set limits makes me feel better. I just wasn’t sure if I was being cruel. 🙂

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        1. There is a term called loving guidance – this is wha toddlers need, they need to know what is safe and what is appropriate – they will push us and challenge us but they really need this guidance to know how to navigate their world

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