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Newborn care! Everything you need to know from hospital to home!

Bundoo Medical Director
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Newborn care! Everything you need to know from hospital to home!

Bring all your newborn care questions as we discuss what you need to know during the first week of life with your newborn! We’ll discuss hospital care, returning home and the first week. Nothing is off limits!

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  1. Hello! Are you ready? Let’s start. Newborn care begins in the hospital. More and more hospitals are following the “baby friendly” initiative. Gone are the days when your baby went to the nursery for diaper changes, baths and feedings. In many hospitals the baby remains with the mother from the time of birth through the time you leave. While the nurses are close by, the care of the baby is largely performed by the new parent(s).

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    1. I loved rooming in and can’t imagine wanting to be separated from my baby right after birth. But I have a few friends who love getting to sleep through the night in the hospital and are eager to send their baby to the nursery! With my second baby’s birth last year, the bath was different than with my first. The nurse bathed her in the room and I got to watch to see how she did it. She shared tips for bathing which was pretty helpful!

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      1. So glad you had a great experience! I think the best hospitals are offering mothers time to bond and offering bedside support.

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  2. Did you know that over 90% of parents make one or more car seat mistakes during their first ride home? Here’s a few tips on how to keep your newborn safe in the car.
    http://www.bundoo.com/articles/5-car-seat-mistakes-youre-making-before-your-newborn-leaves-the-hospital/

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  3. One of the most common questions I get is “how do I care for my newborn’s umbilical cord?” Believe it or not, but this one is simple. Keep it dry! Really! That’s all you need to know. The cord will gradually dry out over the first few days and then begin to separate. Keeping it dry allows this process to happen naturally and in a timely fashion. Old wisdom dictated alcohol swabs to dry out the cord, but that has really fallen out of use. Just dry it with a dry cloth when you change a diaper. No special equipment needed.

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    1. I have a 13-month-old and they sent me home from the hospital with alcohol wipes. I had read that this was old practice, but wondered why hospitals aren’t sharing new information.

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      1. It’s not wrong per se, just not necessary. In fact, using swabs was what I was taught not too many years ago in residency.

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        1. Good to know it’s not harmful in any case. 🙂

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  4. Bathing a newborn can also cause stress in new parents. Rest assured, in the first week at home your baby doesn’t need a traditional “bath” at all. We want to wipe down any areas that are sticky (or stinky) with warm water and a very minimal amount of soap. Keep the umbilicus dry. This can be done on a clean towel laid out on the floor or in the baby’s crib. No complex bath scenario needed!

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  5. Keeping track of feedings, wet diapers and dirty diapers is a great way to know your baby is getting the nutrition they need in the first week. As a general rule, pediatricians hope that babies have one wet diaper in the first twenty four hours, two in the second, three by the third day and so on. The thick sticky poop (called meconium) should clear out after the first two to four days and be replaced with very soft, very thin yellow stools. Tired parents often use a log on their phone or on paper to keep track – this is useful to both parents and doctors.

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  6. Breastfeeding often causes expectant parents worry, but it doesn’t have to! This excellent article by my favorite OB/GYN, Dr. Jen will help you prepare!
    http://www.bundoo.com/articles/12-tips-for-getting-started-with-breastfeeding/

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  7. For all of you following along, I hope this was helpful! Feel free to post more questions after 10PM – I’ll be checking back tomorrow!

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