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What to expect when labor begins

What to expect when labor begins

On Tuesday, November 10th from 9-10pm EST we’ll be hosting another Bundoo chat, and this time the topic will be all about what to expect when labor begins. If you are pregnant and wondering what it’s like to go into labor, or how to know if it’s the real thing or not, feel free to join us during that hour! No questions are too silly, we promise! Or if you just want to share your birth story with other parents, this is your place to do it too. I’ll be there responding during this time to all your questions and comments, so I hope to “see” lots of you there!

Comments

  1. I LOVE hearing birth stories! With my first, my water broke unexpectedly when I was going to bed. I had prepared for “normal” labor, so I had no idea what to do when my water broke before contractions started! Then just a little over 9 hours later, I had a baby! With my second, I was induced 4.5 weeks early due to potentially life-threatening complications. They started pitocin at 4am, and I had a baby 10 hours later. That labor was actually a little more “normal” in my eyes because contractions progressed as I thought they would, and my water didn’t break until I was 7cm dilated – accidentally done when my OB checked me. I had a baby in my arms just 20 minutes after that! They say every pregnancy is different and every labor is different just like every baby is different. Even though it was frightening to go in to labor not knowing what to expect completely, I still really enjoyed both of my labor and delivery experiences!

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    1. It’s so true that each labor can be so uniquely different, which I think can sometimes throw second (and third) time moms for a loop! Glad you had good outcomes on both!

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      1. Adding to the “every time is different” thought… Generally, are subsequent labors shorter or easier? And what about recovery? My first was an awful recovery, but I bounced back quickly with my second. I don’t know if my body just “remembered” what to do or maybe I just had to bounce back because I had a toddler to also chase around. Just wondering what the stats (real or unofficial) say about labor getting easier the more you do it!

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        1. Yes, the good news is that labor tends to go faster after the first time (hooray!). Some moms also say recovery is quicker, mainly because they know what to expect after having done it once before. Others who have little ones to care for in addition to a newborn might think it’s actually more difficult though, since they can’t always rest or sleep when baby sleeps! This is why I think it is important to have help no matter what number baby you are having…

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  2. Hi everyone! So sorry for the late start tonight! I had two little ones who didn’t think bedtime applied to them 🙂 But I’m here now and would love to take your questions on what to expect when labor begins – what are you worried about or wish you were prepared for? Share your questions here and let’s chat!

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  3. Is it true that getting pitocin and being induced makes it more likely you will have a C-section? The C-section statistics have increased to 30-40% and its mainly in the large cities. Is it that doctors and hospitals are rushing moms? And if so what can the average patient do to prevent this?

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    1. Great questions! It’s true that being induced puts you at an increased risk for a csection which is why it’s best to wait for labor to start on its own unless there is a medical problem. Increasing csection rates are probably from multiple issues: more women who’ve ever had a csection getting pregnant again and opting for a repeat csection (or not having the option to labor after a csection being made available), increased usage of induction of labor, and more women getting pregnant with risk factors that make csections more likely (being older, obese, etc). The medicolegal climate has played a role too, sadly. Doctors who are afraid of being sued in a world where lawsuits are more common may make them more likely to do a csection sooner.

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    2. And the best way to prevent this would be to have a healthy pregnancy, avoid induction if possible, and ask your doctor about their csection rate. A high rate can be a red flag and may prompt you to seek alternative care. Also care with a midwife with doula support may also increase your chances of a vaginal delivery, though there are many wonderful OBs who are supportive of vaginal deliveries too!

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  4. If you are pregnant and starting to think about what to pack in your hospital bag, here’s our guide for what you really need: http://www.bundoo.com/articles/everything-you-need-in-your-labor-and-delivery-bag/

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    1. It’s a fantastic list, too!

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  5. What’s the rule for when to go to the hospital? I thought there was a rule about how far apart contractions are, but I can’t remember. Asking for a friend. Thanks!

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    1. Yes, the 5-1-1 rule! In general, when contractions are every 5 minutes apart lasting about 1 minute each, and it’s been going on for 1 hour it’s time to head in. However it’s always ok to call sooner if you just aren’t sure or have any worries. Tell your friend good luck!

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      1. Here’s a good article for your friend too about the various signs of labor: http://www.bundoo.com/articles/signs-of-labor/

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  6. Please feel free to keep posting your questions and we’ll keep answering them for you! Many good wishes to all the pregnant mamas out there who are getting ready to meet their little ones. Thanks for joining us tonight!

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