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How to handle babies who love solids

How to handle babies who love solids

My 8 month old hasn’t found a food he doesn’t love – which is lots of fun, and makes meals very enjoyable – but how do I know when to stop?! If allowed I think he would just keep eating. For example, at one breakfast he ate almost an entire banana, blueberries, and some cheerios, and was still eyeing our food. In general I just stop when I run out of food (or time…), but truly is it OK to let him keep going if he is hungry? He still nurses fine throughout the day/night and is by no means huge – maybe 50%? – but I’ve just never seen a baby eat like this. I worry for the teen years, that’s for sure!

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  1. My baby eats a TON, too! More than her 8-year-old cousin. I have wondered the same thing. (My baby is average percentile too)

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  2. Why worry? He’s growing faster than ever! Now when he is a kid and you need to get “husky” size jeans… Maybe worry. Not only the health aspect but nobody likes being called “chub boy” by mean little girls. Sorry I thought I erased that from memory!! 😮

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    1. Ha thankfully we aren’t there yet! My main concern is that breastmilk/formula is to be the main source of calories for babies less than a year, so I don’t want to displace that by solids which are often lower in calories when compared ounce for ounce. Maybe it’s time I start with French fries and icecream for him? (Just kidding! Leigh Anne’s point below is a great one)

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  3. My comment did not get posted – make sure the food he eats is nutrient dense – like beans, lean meats, rich colored vegetable like sweet potatoes, butternut squash, these foods will fill him

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  4. Hey there!
    I would let your little guy lead the way–in other words, let him decide when he’s done. More and more research is coming out about being too controlling with feeding (not allowing more food, stopping the meal, being restrictive with certain types of food) and it all points to children losing their sense of hunger and satisfaction/satiety when eating…which can lead to overeating in the long run and higher BMI. Bottom line: let your child determine when to stop and just make sure to provide a variety of healthy food. Kids are pretty good at self-regulation when left alone–they may eat a big breakfast, then taper off a bit during the rest of the day. Or, they can have big days of eating and other days when they seem to live on air! In my daughter’s case, she was a big meal eater but rarely snacked…and she has had a healthy weight all along (almost 18 now!).

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    1. I’ve also read that being controlling with feeding (and in general) can cause eating disorders. Any merit to that?

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