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How to teach a toddler?

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How to teach a toddler?

I’m looking for creative ways to teach my 20-month-old son about numbers and colors. His love for letters began around 13 months through the book “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom.” We then used the colorful foam letters in his bath each night to help teach and reinforce his new knowledge (he now knows the whole alphabet, just not in order), so I thought the same technique would work for numbers. However, he wants absolutely nothing to do with numbers. He won’t even look at them. He has also become very interested in colors lately, but everything is either “orange” or “blue” to him. I can usually ask him to “find the yellow car,” and he will, but not always. What are some tried and true ways to introduce numbers and work on learning colors? And should I even push the subject now or just continue to go with the flow?

Comments

  1. This is a slippery slope, but you can use candies or beloved snack items (different colors of goldfish, for example) to practice both colors and numbers. I taught my daughter colors this way, and now we practice addition and subtraction.

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  2. I used a metal cookie sheet with magnetic numbers/letters/shapes for my little girl. She loved playing with it and you can make up a lot of games/activities. I sometimes put a lot of numbers all over the pan and we play “I Spy.” I’ll say, “I spy a red 7.” She gets really excited when she gets it right and little does she know she learning at the same time. 🙂

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  3. I think it’s great you are thinking of ways to creatively expose your son to learning! The key I believe is to follow their lead – if you try to force your idea of what they should be learning (at this young age, anyway) it might take the fun out of it for them. He may just not yet be in a phase for numbers, so you could instead spend time focusing on letters, colors etc while keeping numbers on the sidelines (“I see two letter A’s!” or whatever).

    I do a lot of this with my son and I know the internet had so many wonderful resources to guide me with this kind of home learning. You can check out my personal blog (www.themamayears.com) and see the info tabs about tot school – might give you some ideas of great websites/resources to foster toddler learning in a creative way. Most of all, have fun!! 🙂

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  4. It’s good to have creative ways to weave educational opportunities into everyday life. I had a set of magnetic letters on my fridge. They were there for many years actually. When my kids were learning their letters and colors they could “play” and learn while I was cooking or doing any of my seeming many chores in the kitchen. Then as they started reading we would use those same letters to form words and eventually we could leave short note for each other. The down side is that they were bulky, but I kept a little container in a cabinet near the fridge so they could take them out to use when wanted. This way it didn’t feel they cluttered up the kitchen constantly. We also played the “I spy” game with letters and colors regularly every time we were out and about. My kids are now much older but we continue our “I spy” tradition, looking for other things now, anytime we are sitting at a restaurant or waiting in line.

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  5. These are all fabulous suggestions! I can’t wait to start using them! I think we may focus on colors first, since he is showing a big interest in them right now and still has zero interest in numbers. I also failed to mention that we used puzzles to learn shapes (heart, star, diamond, circle, square, oval, rectangle, and triangle). He really loves learning, which makes me very happy! I just want to continue to make it fun, so he will continue loving it! 🙂

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