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Feeding & Nutrition: Your 1-Year-Old

Bundoo Pediatric Nutritionist
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Feeding & Nutrition: Your 1-Year-Old

Wondering what to feed your one-year old? Which foods are ideal for beginning the process? How to move along in flavors and textures? How to prevent choking? Whether to use the spoon or not?
Join me in the Bundoo Community and ask your questions!

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  1. Can’t wait to learn what you have to say!

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  2. Hi Everyone! It’s Jill–got any questions for me about what to feed your one year old?

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    1. What size do I need to chop up food for my 13 month old? I often just give her something large to hold herself and bite pieces off, but she tends to take huge bites. She also likes to eat super fast…

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      1. Brad,
        If you can imagine the size of your daughter’s throat–small!–you want to cut up food so that if it does slip down her throat, it won’t get caught. In general, that’s about the size of a small dice, or 1/4″ dice. Since she is eating whole food, you’ll want to keep an eye on her when she’s eating–young children learn pretty fast, but you want to be safe. You can also try to encourage her to take smaller bites. 🙂

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  3. My daughter is almost 14m old. My son is 3.5yo, but for the life of me, I can’t remember what I used to feed him at this age! She’s a foodie…she eats any- and everything we put in front of her, so it shouldn’t be so hard. Maybe just because I have 2 now. How much should she be eating at each meal? Per day? Caloric intake? How does milk (still breastfed) factor in?

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    1. Kristen, The good news is that your daughter should be eating the family food at this point. All you have to do is modify the texture for safety (chop, dice, mash, etc). As for calories, we don’t count calories so much as allow young children to self-regulate their eating. Offer her the meals your family is eating (balanced with as many food groups as possible) and let her eat until she signals she is full and done. At her age, she should be having 3 meals + 3 “snacks” which can be food, milk or a breastfeeding session. She should be getting most of her nutrition from solid food at this point and breastmilk is supplementary.

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      1. My wife still nurses, but our daughter can pretty much go throughout the day without it. Hiwever, at night she still wants the milk. When my wife is gone can I still use the 0-12 month formula or do I need to quit now that she’s past 12 months? What’s the best substitute for cow milk for babies?

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        1. Yes, it’s fine to drop the infant formula at a year. Generally, children transition to cow’s milk; if you’re not planning on cow’s milk, soy milk is the next best nutritious non-infant formula beverage. You can certainly stick with infant formula for a bit, but if you were my client, I would encourage you to make the transition now! 🙂

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      2. Thank you! That all sounds doable!

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  4. We love the ease and portability of “pouches” for snacks. We get the organic ones but do we need to limit the use of these? I heard that the act of sucking on these pouches can lead to future problems.

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    1. I was about to ask about pouches. Also, baby cereal (we use oatmeal)…should we switch to something else? I really only used the oatmeal for the iron. We did a modified baby-led weaning feeding style, so I never really gave her purees or much on a spoon except the oatmeal cereal.

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      1. Oatmeal is fine. There are other cereals that are fortified that you could use (barley, for example), but at your daughter’s age, she can eat ready-to-eat cereal like Oat-O’s or Kix softened with milk–ready-to-eat cereals are generally fortified with iron also.

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    2. Yes, Brad, there is some evidence that too much reliance on pouches may delay language development and texture progression with eating. I think occasional use is fine, but if you find they are showing up daily, I’d re-look at ways to get more texture in the diet.

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      1. Thanks! She certainly gets at least one a day so I’ll dial it back. However, she eats so much that one pouch is barely a full snack for her, and would only be part of a meal.

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  5. Thoughts on smoothies? What if your little one refuses fruits and/or veggies? And is one better than the other…fruits vs. veggies? Can they eat just one group if they refuse the other? My daughter tends to eat veggies and not fruits (from what I can tell, that’s backwards from most kids!), so I was wondering if that’s okay for her to focus on one group for now. I still offer fruits, but she plays and doesn’t eat much usually. And I despise throwing out food that was slobbered on but not eaten…

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    1. Smoothies are great and an easy way for you to get both fruit and veggies in your daughter’s diet! Yes, keep offering the fruit regularly, and relax about whether she eats it or not since you have the vegetables as a reliable source. It all takes time and lots of exposure. As for the waste…just offer a small bit, and package the rest up in storage bags for another meal? Waste, unfortunately, goes with the territory!

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      1. Thanks! So true on the waste…it just hurts my heart, but I’m not going to eat soggy leftovers! 😉 Some go to the dog, but we learned the hard way that avocado is NOT a dog friendly leftover. 🙁

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        1. Ha! I didn’t know that!

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