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sleeping and eating patterns of newborns

sleeping and eating patterns of newborns

My sister at the age of 40 just had her first and last baby on Tuesday, October 13, 2015. She’s having a lot of problems getting her baby girl, Sophia, to latch on. How often do day’s old babies eat? How long on each breast? And typically for how long? Also, what about sleeping patterns? How often should she sleep and for approximately how long? My questions are typically for me as I have no children of my own but I’m going to be Sophia’ s main caregiver once my sister goes back to work. Any advice/information you can give me is most appreciated.Thank you for your time and help. Jill

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  1. I’ve bf 2 of my kids (still am 1) and in my experience mine ate every 1 1/2- 3 or 4 hrs but your not supposed to let them go passed 4. However some babies will stay aslp longer so may have to be woken up. I put alarms for my 1st bf baby but my 2nd i just waited for her to wake up which didn’t make a difference. My babies did great latching on so all i can say to that is try calling the bf hotline, google, or have her go to a drs. office where they can help her physically do it. Hope this helps:)

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  2. Oh and I forgot to mention Congrats to your sister!!

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  3. Oh and I forgot to mention Congrats to your sister and if she’s exclusive bf she will literally bf half the day if not more for maybe 10 min. on each breast, depending on how hungry Sophia is. For the first couple months or so Sophia will be doing alot of sleeping so don’t be too worried about that. It’ll be potty, feed, and sleep for a while with a little bit of awake time. All babies are different though this is just from my experience.

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  4. It’s not uncommon to have it take a while before the baby gets the hang of latching on. My second had a really hard time, but I was stubborn enough to stick with it until he figured it out. If you sister is having a hard time, I would suggest that she talk to a lactation consultant. I think there are some who will do home visits.
    As far as how long the baby should sleep and eat, right now there’s really no right answer to that. Typically a baby will want to eat every two hours, but it can be shorter than that, especially if it’s going through a growth spurt, and it can be longer, especially as the baby gets older (but like Kayla said, you shouldn’t let a newborn go longer than 4 hours). There’s probably an average amount that a newborn sleeps, but I’m not sure what it is, except that it’s a lot (and usually during the day instead of the night, haha). My kids started to get more scheduled in their sleeping patterns (naps and nighttime) somewhere between 3-6 months.
    I hope that helps! Congratulations to your sister!!

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  5. Congrats, Aunt! There are many reasons a baby may struggle to latch. Mostly it’s just a learning curve but could be something like tongue tie. I agree with Lauren that she should see a lactation consultant. No point in waiting when it will make her life so much easier! The best place to start is by calling the hospital or birthing center. Most have one on staff just to help the women who deliver there.

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    1. I totally agree! Breast feeding is natural but it is not easy! Reaching out for help is a great idea. Congrats – how exciting for all of you!

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  6. Also, don’t be afraid of evening cluster feeding – the confidence enemy of new mamas. Babies will have a period of the day where they just want to nurse and nurse and nurse, it’s normal and does not mean she does not have enough milk!

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  7. Congrats to your sister and to you! I agree with what everyone has said here, especially the part about getting your sister in to see a good lactation consultant. Their expertise can boost a mother’s confidence like nothing else! The early days of breastfeeding can be so challenging because everyone is new at it, and the fatigue from recovering from a birth and feeding so frequently can be rough. However, I hope some of our breastfeeding articles (you can find them under the Bundoo A-Z tab) can help make things a bit clearer! And since you are going to be Sophia’s main caregiver, they will probably be helpful for you too (also going with your sister to any lactation consultant/pediatrician visits might help you too!), especially our topics on bottle-feeding the breastfed baby. Good luck and let us know what more we can help with!

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