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Thanksgivukkah: latkes and turkey

My holiday season promptly starts at the taste of latkes.

My Grandma’s potato pancakes are the star of Hanukkah every year and have been since the beginning of (my) time. Dreidels are fun, presents are special, but my Grandma’s potato latkes are practically the backbone of my family’s Hanukkah celebration.

Latkes are sort of like pizza: everyone has a version they believe is the perfect one. If you ask me, as long as it’s made with love, it’s hard to turn me away from any variation. But Grandma’s latkes own my heart. She’s made some variations over the years but I just consider them small, delicious improvements.

This year, Hanukkah begins on Thanksgiving (Thanksgivukkah, if you will) and this double holiday won’t happen again for another 70,000 years. So what better way to celebrate this once-in-a-lifetime event than join the turkey and the latkes?

Grandma’s Potato Latkes (serving size: 4-6):

2 lbs potatoes
1 small to medium onion, chopped
1 egg
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 cup matzo meal
1 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp pepper
vegetable oil for frying

Wash and chop potatoes into bite-sized pieces, set aside (we leave the skins on but this is a personal preference).

Add onion, potatoes, baking powder, salt, pepper, and egg to a blender and blend until well mixed. Slowly add more potatoes to the blender and incorporate mixture until full. You may need to blend in batches. Pour mixture into large bowl. Your mixture should sort of look like oatmeal.

Add matzo meal to your potato and onion mixture and mix well. If mixture is too thin, add more matzo meal to your consistency preference.

Add oil to a large, heavy frying pan and heat to medium. Drop a tablespoon of the potato mixture and cook until golden brown and crisp on the side (about 3-5 minutes). Flip and flatten and brown other side, then remove from pan and place on a paper towel to drain any excess oil.

Continue frying until all potato mixture is used. Add more oil if needed.

Serve with applesauce, sour cream, or just sugar.

 

What’s your favorite Hanukkah tradition? Share in the comments!

About Dori Zinn, Bundoo Associate Editor

Dori Zinn is an Associate Editor at Bundoo.

Comments

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  1. Suddenly, I’m starving! On my way to the kitchen to make these with the kids right now. Thanks for sharing your family tradition with us.