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Does my child need to see a dentist before turning one?

According to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), tooth decay in young children is on the rise.

In fact, tooth decay has increased by 17 percent in 2 to 5-year-olds over the past 10 years. Dentists blame a delay in dental care for this rise.

The AAPD recommends that infants see a dentist for the first time when their first tooth pops through, usually between the ages of 6 and 12 months. Early dental care, combined with good dental hygiene and healthy eating practices can protect your child from cavities early in life. Go ahead and make that dentist appointment!

Comments

  1. I was curious about this, as my daughter’s two bottom teeth are now out. I’m think about waiting until she’s a year. But I guess I could make an appointment any time now!

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  2. I am going to say I disagree a little bit. I took my daughter when she was 8 months old because she had some plaque behind her bottom tooth and the pediatrician recommended I take her just in case. Well I did and she screamed the entire time. It was horrible to witness. I asked our new pediatrician and she said there is no reason to take them before they are three as long as they have a healthy diet and are brushing teeth at home. I think that at each milestone check-up the pediatrician can check their teeth and decide if there is any cause for concern. I believe the reason tooth decay is on the rise is because parents continue to feed their children sugar and juice. I can be pretty strict on what my children eat and they very seldom drink juice so I have decided to wait to take my youngest daughter to the dentist until she is three.

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  3. My dentist doesn’t accept children until they turn 3. Therefore, I waited to take my daughter until right after her birthday. Her teeth were just fine, but it’s nice to know that with my second I should try to take her much sooner.

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